Art in Florence

Vasari Corridor

Between the Uffizi Gallery and the Ponte Vecchio is a true artistic jewel of the city, the Vasari Corridor, a distance of approximately one kilometer, which opened in 1565, was invented by Giorgio Vasari for Cosimo I de 'Medici allow to go "home and office" and vice versa without setting foot in the street.

This emblem of Florence will host an experimental project superintendent of the Museums of Florence, Cristina Acidini, which from 1 January 2014 will open every day the Vasari Corridor with 12 inputs scanned during visiting hours at the Uffizi, organized in groups of no more than 25 people in turn. 

Ponte Vecchio (Old Bridge)


Built in 1345, was Florence's first bridge across the Arno River. It is the only surviving bridge from Florence's medieval days (others were destroyed in World War II). The Old Bridge is still lined with shops selling gold and silver jewelry. From the bridge, you'll have an amazing view along the Arno River and beyond

Palazzo Vecchio


The Palazzo Vecchio is the old town hall of Florence, built in the 14th century. Its grand interior, which has seen such a fascinating history of events, has beautifully decorated rooms and courtyards with ornate ceilings, wall tapestries, carved doors, and fine art including works by Michelangelo, Vasari, and Da Vinci.

 

The Paradise Gate - Battistero of the Duomo

The East entrance of the Baptistery of San Giovanni, reopens to the public after a restoration lasted 26 years. A great piece of work that has returned to humanity a true masterpiece of Lorenzo Ghiberti artistic genius, damaged as a result of the disastrous flood of ’66 and it replaced by a copy pending restoration of the original. The “Gates of Paradise” is preserved in the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo and it will possible to admire it every day from 09:00 to 19:30 and on Sundays from 09:00 to 13:45.


Officina Profumo Farmaceutica di Santa Maria Novella

This centuries-old pharmacy/herbalist/perfumerie is an interesting part of Florence’s cultural heritage. All rooms are decorated, even with ornate ceilings. There are so many historical objects related to the production of medicines, natural creams, and perfumes that it is also considered a “museum of tradition.” It is a unique part of Florence’s history.
Open every day 10:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. (Free entrance). Located behind Santa Maria Novella church.